Pink Floyd - The Star Club, Copenhagen, Denmark; September 13, 1967
I posted this one a while back but the link is long gone. If you need it, Big O’s got it (and this remaster might be a bit better, too). And you need it! This tape surfaced a few years ago — it’s a rare recording of the Barrett-era Floyd onstage. Vocals are very low in the mix, but whatever, just think of it as an awesome instrumental set and prepare to scream thy last scream.  

Pink Floyd - The Star Club, Copenhagen, Denmark; September 13, 1967

I posted this one a while back but the link is long gone. If you need it, Big O’s got it (and this remaster might be a bit better, too). And you need it! This tape surfaced a few years ago — it’s a rare recording of the Barrett-era Floyd onstage. Vocals are very low in the mix, but whatever, just think of it as an awesome instrumental set and prepare to scream thy last scream.  

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts, May 7, 1977
The Summer of Dead ain’t over yet! Joel Berk tells us about Boston 77 via Bloomington 04! (I’m still accepting submissions, if you’re straggling!) 
The Grateful Dead bug bit me early, somewhere in the midst of jr. high, and started innocently enough — a friend’s dad putting on that one ‘best of’ compilation Skeletons From the Closet. I was hooked pretty instantly. My favorite band in kindergarten was Traffic and my favorite band at the time was The Who, so I was already well on my way towards the path of strange noises that I’m still on, but I’d never heard anything like this before. Another friend’s dad was an old head and in no time I’d borrowed>burnt his entire collection of Dead albums. I sat with those studio records for a few years, listening as intently as I was capable of but somehow still unable to wrap my head around the thing. Was this a folk band? Were they a jazz band? Were they purveyors of that “classic 60s sound”?
In high school I finally acquired Live Dead and first heard the Grateful Dead Hour around the same time, and realized there was this whole other world of Dead music I hadn’t even been aware of. Around this time was also when Dark Star Orchestra was really beginning to hit their stride. Now I’m not going to get into the merits or lack thereof of that (cover)band, but I will say this — for a young, newly-minted head such as myself, seeing DSO provided an invaluable glimpse into a world that was long gone by the time I’d caught wind of it.
Some time later, it was the summer of 2004 and I was living in Bloomington, IN in between school years at IU…and listening to a lot of Dead. DSO announced their fall tour, which included a date a one of the live music bars in town the night before classes started. A buddy and I whipped out our trusty fake IDs and started to drink all the pitchers of Sierra as the crowd trickled in. Much to our surprise, the room never really filled up. We’d just seen them play to a few hundred people at an all ages theater in town, but I’d say there were only 60-70 tops in attendance this fateful evening.
After much delay, the band finally came onstage, eased into a ripping “Bertha” and we were off. Midway through the first set, this palpable buzz started filling the room as older heads excitedly mumbled back and forth. I distinctly heard “I got my DeadBase in the car, man, I’ll go check at set break” as I made my way to the bar for yet another pitcher of hoppy liquid.
By the start of the second set the three handfuls of people in that bar were freaking out — DSO was really playing the famed 5.7.77 Boston Garden show! Now I, of course, had no idea what that meant at the time. All I knew was I was more in love with the setlist as each tune rolled out. As “Eyes” started I remember this wave of elation washing over me and my buddy. I continued to guzzle Sierra with the determined passion of show-seasoned underagers.
The show was outstanding, probably one of the best I’ve ever seen - which is really odd to say regarding a cover band. I’ve of course put the whole May77 run in proper context since then…but to be 20 with no frame of reference and catch some shit like that in a bar with less than 100 people made an indelible impression.
As you surely already know, this show slays from top to bottom and can be easily streamed from The Archive.
Joel Berk is a Chicago-based writer — follow him on tumblr and twitter!

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts, May 7, 1977

The Summer of Dead ain’t over yet! Joel Berk tells us about Boston 77 via Bloomington 04! (I’m still accepting submissions, if you’re straggling!) 

The Grateful Dead bug bit me early, somewhere in the midst of jr. high, and started innocently enough — a friend’s dad putting on that one ‘best of’ compilation Skeletons From the Closet. I was hooked pretty instantly. My favorite band in kindergarten was Traffic and my favorite band at the time was The Who, so I was already well on my way towards the path of strange noises that I’m still on, but I’d never heard anything like this before. Another friend’s dad was an old head and in no time I’d borrowed>burnt his entire collection of Dead albums. I sat with those studio records for a few years, listening as intently as I was capable of but somehow still unable to wrap my head around the thing. Was this a folk band? Were they a jazz band? Were they purveyors of that “classic 60s sound”?

In high school I finally acquired Live Dead and first heard the Grateful Dead Hour around the same time, and realized there was this whole other world of Dead music I hadn’t even been aware of. Around this time was also when Dark Star Orchestra was really beginning to hit their stride. Now I’m not going to get into the merits or lack thereof of that (cover)band, but I will say this — for a young, newly-minted head such as myself, seeing DSO provided an invaluable glimpse into a world that was long gone by the time I’d caught wind of it.

Some time later, it was the summer of 2004 and I was living in Bloomington, IN in between school years at IU…and listening to a lot of Dead. DSO announced their fall tour, which included a date a one of the live music bars in town the night before classes started. A buddy and I whipped out our trusty fake IDs and started to drink all the pitchers of Sierra as the crowd trickled in. Much to our surprise, the room never really filled up. We’d just seen them play to a few hundred people at an all ages theater in town, but I’d say there were only 60-70 tops in attendance this fateful evening.

After much delay, the band finally came onstage, eased into a ripping “Bertha” and we were off. Midway through the first set, this palpable buzz started filling the room as older heads excitedly mumbled back and forth. I distinctly heard “I got my DeadBase in the car, man, I’ll go check at set break” as I made my way to the bar for yet another pitcher of hoppy liquid.

By the start of the second set the three handfuls of people in that bar were freaking out — DSO was really playing the famed 5.7.77 Boston Garden show! Now I, of course, had no idea what that meant at the time. All I knew was I was more in love with the setlist as each tune rolled out. As “Eyes” started I remember this wave of elation washing over me and my buddy. I continued to guzzle Sierra with the determined passion of show-seasoned underagers.

The show was outstanding, probably one of the best I’ve ever seen - which is really odd to say regarding a cover band. I’ve of course put the whole May77 run in proper context since then…but to be 20 with no frame of reference and catch some shit like that in a bar with less than 100 people made an indelible impression.

As you surely already know, this show slays from top to bottom and can be easily streamed from The Archive.

Joel Berk is a Chicago-based writer — follow him on tumblr and twitter!

Bitchin Bajas - HQ, Chicago, Illinois, July 16, 2014

Over on Aquarium Drunkard, I wrote a little bit about Bitchin Bajas new/magnificent self-titled double LP and Cave’s forthcoming archival Release. Both totally excellent. The connection between the two bands is multi-instrumentalist Cooper Crain. He also produced that great Ryley Walker record from this year. Whatta guy! Here are the BBs playing live over the summer — the show was a bill with Chris Forsyth and the Solar Motel Band, so here’s a little bit of their set as well

The Little Black Egg Big Band - Three Lobed / WXDU Day Show, King’s, Raleigh, North Carolina, September 5, 2014  (Donation Download)
A Doom & Gloom dream come true collaboration — Steve Gunn, Georgia Hubley, Ira Kaplan, James McNew, Letha Rodman Melchior and William Tyler all joined forces at last week’s Three Lobed/WXDU Day Show for a beautiful sonic journey. Thanks to NYC Taper/Acid Jack for recording and sharing. Download and donate — proceeds go to helping Letha battle cancer. 

The Little Black Egg Big Band - Three Lobed / WXDU Day Show, King’s, Raleigh, North Carolina, September 5, 2014  (Donation Download)

A Doom & Gloom dream come true collaboration — Steve Gunn, Georgia Hubley, Ira Kaplan, James McNew, Letha Rodman Melchior and William Tyler all joined forces at last week’s Three Lobed/WXDU Day Show for a beautiful sonic journey. Thanks to NYC Taper/Acid Jack for recording and sharing. Download and donate — proceeds go to helping Letha battle cancer. 

"Prelude to 110, 220, or Chelsea Walls" - Loose Fur, St. Ann’s Warehouse, Brooklyn, New York, December 13, 2002

Over on Pitchfork, I wrote a little bit about some of the hidden gems from Jeff Tweedy’s various side projects. Some good stuff. I still love those Loose Fur records — wish they would do more! Here’s a nice little rarity, which appeared as a bonus track on the Japanese edition of Born Again In The USA. It’s an epic workout from one of the few Loose Fur live performances. Totally gorgeous.  

Popol Vuh - Live 1973
Thanks to Sleeve over at Shard of Beauty for sharing this excellent recording of Popol Vuh — LIVE! Not much live stuff from Florian Fricke and co., so you totally want it. Here’s what we think we know: 
This is a soundboard recording of a live performance in 1973, probably late summer or early fall, in the church in Baumberg in Germany (which accounts for the beautiful natural reverb). My guess is that this is just Daniel Fichelscher on guitar and Florian Fricke on keyboards and vocal (and may be the first recording of Fichelscher as a member of Popol Vuh - he would become co-partner with Fricke for all subsequent Popol Vuh albums. Vocalist Djong Yun did not sing here, because she was away in America at the time. Fricke’s dissatisfaction with his vocals - heard here and on the studio album from 1973, “Seligpreisung” - would prompt him to later add another vocalist, Renate Knaup, whom he met through Fichelscher (both Fichelscher and Knaup had been members of Amon Duul II). 
Song list (all are extended versions of the following pieces from their 1973 album “Seligpreisung”): 
1)Weinen und Lachen 2)Hungern und Dursten 3)Hungern und Dursten (2nd take) 4)Willig Arm 5)Leid Klagen 6) Interview (German) 
33 minutes of music followed by a 12 minute interview, which sounds like it was recorded in a park - because they sometimes have to pause to let a truck go by.

Popol Vuh - Live 1973

Thanks to Sleeve over at Shard of Beauty for sharing this excellent recording of Popol Vuh — LIVE! Not much live stuff from Florian Fricke and co., so you totally want it. Here’s what we think we know: 

This is a soundboard recording of a live performance in 1973, probably late summer or early fall, in the church in Baumberg in Germany (which accounts for the beautiful natural reverb). My guess is that this is just Daniel Fichelscher on guitar and Florian Fricke on keyboards and vocal (and may be the first recording of Fichelscher as a member of Popol Vuh - he would become co-partner with Fricke for all subsequent Popol Vuh albums. Vocalist Djong Yun did not sing here, because she was away in America at the time. Fricke’s dissatisfaction with his vocals - heard here and on the studio album from 1973, “Seligpreisung” - would prompt him to later add another vocalist, Renate Knaup, whom he met through Fichelscher (both Fichelscher and Knaup had been members of Amon Duul II).

Song list (all are extended versions of the following pieces from their 1973 album “Seligpreisung”):

1)Weinen und Lachen
2)Hungern und Dursten
3)Hungern und Dursten (2nd take)
4)Willig Arm
5)Leid Klagen
6) Interview (German)

33 minutes of music followed by a 12 minute interview, which sounds like it was recorded in a park - because they sometimes have to pause to let a truck go by.

Leonard Bernstein :: Inside Pop

I’m reading Bob Stanley’s Yeah! Yeah! Yeah! The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyonce and he devotes a bit of space to this 1966 documentary, which features Leonard Bernstein exploring the heady new music world of 1966 — “the year it all came together,” Stanley claims. I’ve seen clips of it, but never watched the whole thing. Let’s watch together — it’s got Frank Zappa, Graham Nash, Brian Wilson and many more! 

Here Comes The Collapsed Lung: Brian Eno Had A Very Busy 1974
The ever-reliable Dangerous Minds has a nice overview of Eno’s annus mirabilis 1974, and included a link to D&G’s Winkies compilation. Lots of good stuff over there — the radio interview is new to me, as is news of this seemingly unavailable short documentary. Someone’s gotta have it, right? As much as DM covers, they don’t even mention that in 1974 Brian also recorded the bulk of Evening Star with Robert Fripp and flew over to NYC to make the infamous Eno Demos with Television. 

Here Comes The Collapsed Lung: Brian Eno Had A Very Busy 1974

The ever-reliable Dangerous Minds has a nice overview of Eno’s annus mirabilis 1974, and included a link to D&G’s Winkies compilation. Lots of good stuff over there — the radio interview is new to me, as is news of this seemingly unavailable short documentary. Someone’s gotta have it, right? As much as DM covers, they don’t even mention that in 1974 Brian also recorded the bulk of Evening Star with Robert Fripp and flew over to NYC to make the infamous Eno Demos with Television