Pink Floyd - The Sports Arena, Los Angeles, California, April 26, 1975
Another one of these Mike Millard master tapes from Big O. The quality here is pretty astounding for a mid-70s audience recording, that’s for sure. Great setlist, with the then-unreleased embryonic Animals numbers, most of Wish You Were Here, a full run-through of Dark Side of the Moon and a massive “Echoes” to close the whole thing out. Throw the windows wide!

Pink Floyd - The Sports Arena, Los Angeles, California, April 26, 1975

Another one of these Mike Millard master tapes from Big O. The quality here is pretty astounding for a mid-70s audience recording, that’s for sure. Great setlist, with the then-unreleased embryonic Animals numbers, most of Wish You Were Here, a full run-through of Dark Side of the Moon and a massive “Echoes” to close the whole thing out. Throw the windows wide!

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Mickey & The Heartbeats, The Matrix, San Francisco, California, December 16, 1968
Let’s follow up the news that those VU Matrix Tapes are finally coming out with some sweet jams from Mickey & The Heartbeats at the Matrix, just about a year before Lou and co. took up residence there. Very much a jam session, but lots of fun stuff (the Airplane’s Jack Casady is on bass for most of it, I think). There is some chatter over on the Archive about there being elements of Pharoah Sanders’ “Creator Has A Master Plan” popping up in the second jam — I don’t hear that, but it’s of a piece with that exploratory vibe. It’s totally free, man. 
EDIT: Actually, I take it back! In the second jam around the 26 minute mark, these dudes slip into something that sounds a lot like Pharoah’s “Master Plan”! Cool stuff. And interesting too, since Karma wasn’t released until mid 1969. Did these guys see Sanders play live around this time, maybe? Possible, I suppose. Or is the jam just a coincidence? MYSTERIES OF THE UNKNOWN. 

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Mickey & The Heartbeats, The Matrix, San Francisco, California, December 16, 1968

Let’s follow up the news that those VU Matrix Tapes are finally coming out with some sweet jams from Mickey & The Heartbeats at the Matrix, just about a year before Lou and co. took up residence there. Very much a jam session, but lots of fun stuff (the Airplane’s Jack Casady is on bass for most of it, I think). There is some chatter over on the Archive about there being elements of Pharoah Sanders’ “Creator Has A Master Plan” popping up in the second jam — I don’t hear that, but it’s of a piece with that exploratory vibe. It’s totally free, man. 

EDIT: Actually, I take it back! In the second jam around the 26 minute mark, these dudes slip into something that sounds a lot like Pharoah’s “Master Plan”! Cool stuff. And interesting too, since Karma wasn’t released until mid 1969. Did these guys see Sanders play live around this time, maybe? Possible, I suppose. Or is the jam just a coincidence? MYSTERIES OF THE UNKNOWN. 

The Velvet Underground :: Matrix Tapes Sampler
Thrilling news for VU heads — apparently a portion of the Velvet Underground’s fabled Matrix Tapes will be part of a deluxe reissue of the band’s self-titled third album, slated for release later this year. The Holy Grail! You can still go check out my write-up and the sampler of tantalizing snippets over on Aquarium Drunkard. Cannot wait to hear this stuff in full. 

The Velvet Underground :: Matrix Tapes Sampler

Thrilling news for VU heads — apparently a portion of the Velvet Underground’s fabled Matrix Tapes will be part of a deluxe reissue of the band’s self-titled third album, slated for release later this year. The Holy Grail! You can still go check out my write-up and the sampler of tantalizing snippets over on Aquarium Drunkard. Cannot wait to hear this stuff in full. 

Bob Dylan - Universal Amphitheatre, Los Angeles, CA, June 1, 1978
Big O has a Mike Millard tape of Dylan in LA on the Street Legal tour. Nice sound! Millard was a legendary taper in the 1970s. His technique: 
"Once inside the building, Mike would be wheeled to the handicap area. He would wire up his hat with microphones and connect them to the cassette deck. When the house lights went down, the weighty tape deck was transferred to the bag and Mike got out of his wheelchair and walked to the front of the venue. It was this elaborate set-up combined with his network of willing helpers that led to the legendary Millard tapes."
(Read more) 

Bob Dylan - Universal Amphitheatre, Los Angeles, CA, June 1, 1978

Big O has a Mike Millard tape of Dylan in LA on the Street Legal tour. Nice sound! Millard was a legendary taper in the 1970s. His technique: 

"Once inside the building, Mike would be wheeled to the handicap area. He would wire up his hat with microphones and connect them to the cassette deck. When the house lights went down, the weighty tape deck was transferred to the bag and Mike got out of his wheelchair and walked to the front of the venue. It was this elaborate set-up combined with his network of willing helpers that led to the legendary Millard tapes."

(Read more

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Where Am I? Who Am I? What The Fuck Am I Doing Here?
A Summer of Dead exclusive! Sort of. Here’s 80 minutes worth of sweet instrumental jams I’ve culled from the Archive, spanning the years 1968-1975. There’s skronk, there’s space, there’s funk, there’s psych. It’s all in there. Except for vocals. No vocals! I don’t know, there’s no real rhyme or reason here — it’s just some groovy, improv-y explorations that have caught my ear recently. I think you’re going to dig it. 
1. Weir’s Words Of Wisdom (1969-12-11 - Thelma Theater)Ace asks the eternal questions. 
2. Jam #1/Fire On The Mountain theme (1971-08-21 - Mickey Hart’s Barn)One of those killer Novato excursions, totally soaring. Check it all out here, it is a good time. 
3. Jam (1975-04-17 - Ace’s Studio)A chilly, bluesy groove! This low-key studio jam is a little out of character for the Dead, but I like it a lot. Almost JJ Cale-y? 
4. Philo Stomp (1972-11-13 - Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall)This thing starts out slamming around in true noize fashion, but eases into a more gentle vibe. Taken from one of Bear’s only audience tapes. He should’ve done that more, the sound is stellar. 
5. Jam (1970-11-20 - U. of Rochester)An extremely funky workout — almost reminiscent of a chooglin’ Booker T and the MG’s jam sesh. The Weir/Garcia interplay here sizzles. Sizzles, I say!  
6. Spanish Jam (1968-03-30 - Carousel Ballroom)These things are weird, but I’m into it. Very stiff and stentorian and non-freewheeling. 
7. Jam (1973-07-27 - Grand Prix Racecourse)The Dead send good vibes out to the assembled masses at Watkins Glen. Some of this meanders (if you can even believe it) but stick around to the end for a nice bit that sounds to my ears somewhere between “Eyes of the World” and “Fire On The Mountain.” 
8. Weir Outro (1968-05-18 - Santa Clara County Fairgrounds)Bobby takes us out. 

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Where Am I? Who Am I? What The Fuck Am I Doing Here?

A Summer of Dead exclusive! Sort of. Here’s 80 minutes worth of sweet instrumental jams I’ve culled from the Archive, spanning the years 1968-1975. There’s skronk, there’s space, there’s funk, there’s psych. It’s all in there. Except for vocals. No vocals! I don’t know, there’s no real rhyme or reason here — it’s just some groovy, improv-y explorations that have caught my ear recently. I think you’re going to dig it. 

1. Weir’s Words Of Wisdom (1969-12-11 - Thelma Theater)
Ace asks the eternal questions. 

2. Jam #1/Fire On The Mountain theme (1971-08-21 - Mickey Hart’s Barn)
One of those killer Novato excursions, totally soaring. Check it all out here, it is a good time. 

3. Jam (1975-04-17 - Ace’s Studio)
A chilly, bluesy groove! This low-key studio jam is a little out of character for the Dead, but I like it a lot. Almost JJ Cale-y? 

4. Philo Stomp (1972-11-13 - Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall)
This thing starts out slamming around in true noize fashion, but eases into a more gentle vibe. Taken from one of Bear’s only audience tapes. He should’ve done that more, the sound is stellar. 

5. Jam (1970-11-20 - U. of Rochester)
An extremely funky workout — almost reminiscent of a chooglin’ Booker T and the MG’s jam sesh. The Weir/Garcia interplay here sizzles. Sizzles, I say!  

6. Spanish Jam (1968-03-30 - Carousel Ballroom)
These things are weird, but I’m into it. Very stiff and stentorian and non-freewheeling. 

7. Jam (1973-07-27 - Grand Prix Racecourse)
The Dead send good vibes out to the assembled masses at Watkins Glen. Some of this meanders (if you can even believe it) but stick around to the end for a nice bit that sounds to my ears somewhere between “Eyes of the World” and “Fire On The Mountain.” 

8. Weir Outro (1968-05-18 - Santa Clara County Fairgrounds)
Bobby takes us out. 

David Kilgour & The Heavy 8’s - Merge 25, July 2014

Head over to Aquarium Drunkard to read my reviews of Clean co-founders/brothers in awesomeness David and Hamish Kilgour’s respective solo albums! Then enjoy this excerpt from David and the Heavy 8’s set last month at the Merge 25 extravaganza. I’ve been listening to this guy play guitar for a long time now and he never fails to amaze. 

Lou Reed - Paris 1973

A hearty RIP to Dick Wagner, the guitarist who (along with Steve Hunter) powered Lou Reed’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal-era band. That LP seems like it should have an awesome accompanying live film, but alas, all we’ve got is this (amateur?) footage, as far as I know anyway. It’s a good time, though — especially Lou and Wagner’s interaction at the end of “White Light/White Heat.” 

The Band - Roosevelt Stadium, Jersey City, New Jersey, August 1, 1973
Hey, we’ll follow up Chris’ post about the Dead’s set on this day back in 1973 with The Band’s set [via BB Chron]. It is very good, obviously. Best day in Jersey City ever?  
1. Back To Memphis 2. Loving You (Has Made My Life Sweeter Than Ever) 3. The Shape I’m In 4. The Weight 5. Stage Fright 6. I Shall Be Released 7. Don’t Do It 8. Endless Highway 9. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down 10. Across the Great Divide 11. This Wheel’s On Fire 12. Life Is A Carnival 13. Share Your Love 14. Up In Cripple Creek 15. Chest Fever 16. W.S. Walcott Medicine Show 17. Saved

The Band - Roosevelt Stadium, Jersey City, New Jersey, August 1, 1973

Hey, we’ll follow up Chris’ post about the Dead’s set on this day back in 1973 with The Band’s set [via BB Chron]. It is very good, obviously. Best day in Jersey City ever?  

1. Back To Memphis 2. Loving You (Has Made My Life Sweeter Than Ever) 3. The Shape I’m In 4. The Weight 5. Stage Fright 6. I Shall Be Released 7. Don’t Do It 8. Endless Highway 9. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down 10. Across the Great Divide 11. This Wheel’s On Fire 12. Life Is A Carnival 13. Share Your Love 14. Up In Cripple Creek 15. Chest Fever 16. W.S. Walcott Medicine Show 17. Saved

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Roosevelt Stadium, Jersey City, New Jersey, August 1, 1973
We’ve done '71 and '72 this week for the Doom & Gloom Summer of Dead extravaganza. Today, Chris Harriott covers ‘73 in a very special Garcia b-day installment. Here’s to August being better than July. 
For four summers in a row, well touring summers at least, the Grateful Dead played Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City. Kudos to John Scher for making that happen. This show does not disappoint, not even a little bit. It’s easily my favorite of the year and usually one of the first shows I reach for when I want to spin something top-shelf for other deadheads or attempt to convert a non-believer. It also has the added bonus of being played on Garcia’s birthday which usually, but not always, meant an above average show. As with almost all ’73 shows, nearly every tune is enjoyable and well-played (see, e.g., “Bird Song”) but the undisputed highlight is the “Dark Star”->”El Paso”->”Eyes”->”Morning Dew” in the second set. A phenomenal re-mastered soundboard featuring this jam segment appeared in the spring of 1998 courtesy of David Gans and was one of the very first shows I ever got on CDR along with 11/15/71 (which, coincidentally, also featured a “Dark Star”->”El Paso.”) At that point I had around eight racks of GD cassettes and little idea just how much things were about to change with the move from cassette to digital and the emergence of online trading communities. Within a very short time, the days of placing ads in Relix (“Your list gets mine, no high-speed dubs”) and waiting for a response were replaced by rapidly-moving online trees, vines and trading. Multi-generational cassette hiss became a thing of the past and hardcore traders stopped sleeping in 45 minute increments. Within in two to three years I probably acquired twice as many shows on CDR as I had on cassette up to that point.
Back to the show. “Dark Star” starts off with lush, gentle improvisation that dances in and around the DS theme for about 5 minutes before Garcia, with able assistance from Keith, steps outside and charts a course for deeper waters. If my ears don’t deceive me, Keith is playing Fender Rhodes as opposed to piano. Within a couple of minutes they’ve picked up the pace and abandoned the theme completely for roughly (though there’s nothing ‘rough’ about it) 12 glorious minutes of peak ‘73 jamming. Garcia seems completely at ease and in full control as he varies the tempo and intensity of jam and constantly introduces new ideas to which the band responds instantly. After a slow descent back to the first verse, the band immediately drops into a quiet deep space/insect fear segment from which a full-blown Tiger meltdown emerges. As with all versions from this era, the second verse is discarded and, instead, the jam dissolves effortlessly into “El Paso.” If pressed for time, one could quickly summarize the whole show simply by stating “Even the ‘El Paso’ is smoking hot.” I’ve always enjoyed Jerry’s back-up vocals on this tune and the present version is no exception.
A massive “Eyes of the World” follows, with Keith returning to piano and enlivening the proceedings. Simply put, this version of Eyes is 20 minutes of everything that makes deadheads beam when they think of this era. Garcia’s leads are crisp and buoyant. The jam truly takes off just before the 8 minute mark, then peaks, gloriously, around 12 minutes before hinting at “Slipknot” and finally dropping into the standard closing coda. While 6/10/73 is slightly longer, I much prefer this version. Garcia never runs out of ideas, even during the post-coda transition into “Morning Dew.”
"Morning Dew" is heartfelt and powerful, Garcia leans into the vocal and band marches triumphantly underneath. Jerry & Keith at the 6 minute mark, man oh man. Garcia brings things down to almost a whisper at 8 minutes or so and then builds back up with an intensely emotive solo. Keith is with him every step of the way. The jam climaxes with Garcia shredding at 12 minutes. If you haven’t had enough at this point, switch to the well above-average AUD recording for an exceptional, though oddly-placed, encore of “GDTRFB.” God bless the Grateful Dead.
Chris Harriott is a Deadhead and attorney living in Northern New Jersey. You can follow him on twitter @ckhesq.

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Roosevelt Stadium, Jersey City, New Jersey, August 1, 1973

We’ve done '71 and '72 this week for the Doom & Gloom Summer of Dead extravaganza. Today, Chris Harriott covers ‘73 in a very special Garcia b-day installment. Here’s to August being better than July. 

For four summers in a row, well touring summers at least, the Grateful Dead played Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City. Kudos to John Scher for making that happen. This show does not disappoint, not even a little bit. It’s easily my favorite of the year and usually one of the first shows I reach for when I want to spin something top-shelf for other deadheads or attempt to convert a non-believer. It also has the added bonus of being played on Garcia’s birthday which usually, but not always, meant an above average show. As with almost all ’73 shows, nearly every tune is enjoyable and well-played (see, e.g., “Bird Song”) but the undisputed highlight is the “Dark Star”->”El Paso”->”Eyes”->”Morning Dew” in the second set. A phenomenal re-mastered soundboard featuring this jam segment appeared in the spring of 1998 courtesy of David Gans and was one of the very first shows I ever got on CDR along with 11/15/71 (which, coincidentally, also featured a “Dark Star”->”El Paso.”) At that point I had around eight racks of GD cassettes and little idea just how much things were about to change with the move from cassette to digital and the emergence of online trading communities. Within a very short time, the days of placing ads in Relix (“Your list gets mine, no high-speed dubs”) and waiting for a response were replaced by rapidly-moving online trees, vines and trading. Multi-generational cassette hiss became a thing of the past and hardcore traders stopped sleeping in 45 minute increments. Within in two to three years I probably acquired twice as many shows on CDR as I had on cassette up to that point.

Back to the show. “Dark Star” starts off with lush, gentle improvisation that dances in and around the DS theme for about 5 minutes before Garcia, with able assistance from Keith, steps outside and charts a course for deeper waters. If my ears don’t deceive me, Keith is playing Fender Rhodes as opposed to piano. Within a couple of minutes they’ve picked up the pace and abandoned the theme completely for roughly (though there’s nothing ‘rough’ about it) 12 glorious minutes of peak ‘73 jamming. Garcia seems completely at ease and in full control as he varies the tempo and intensity of jam and constantly introduces new ideas to which the band responds instantly. After a slow descent back to the first verse, the band immediately drops into a quiet deep space/insect fear segment from which a full-blown Tiger meltdown emerges. As with all versions from this era, the second verse is discarded and, instead, the jam dissolves effortlessly into “El Paso.” If pressed for time, one could quickly summarize the whole show simply by stating “Even the ‘El Paso’ is smoking hot.” I’ve always enjoyed Jerry’s back-up vocals on this tune and the present version is no exception.

A massive “Eyes of the World” follows, with Keith returning to piano and enlivening the proceedings. Simply put, this version of Eyes is 20 minutes of everything that makes deadheads beam when they think of this era. Garcia’s leads are crisp and buoyant. The jam truly takes off just before the 8 minute mark, then peaks, gloriously, around 12 minutes before hinting at “Slipknot” and finally dropping into the standard closing coda. While 6/10/73 is slightly longer, I much prefer this version. Garcia never runs out of ideas, even during the post-coda transition into “Morning Dew.”

"Morning Dew" is heartfelt and powerful, Garcia leans into the vocal and band marches triumphantly underneath. Jerry & Keith at the 6 minute mark, man oh man. Garcia brings things down to almost a whisper at 8 minutes or so and then builds back up with an intensely emotive solo. Keith is with him every step of the way. The jam climaxes with Garcia shredding at 12 minutes. If you haven’t had enough at this point, switch to the well above-average AUD recording for an exceptional, though oddly-placed, encore of “GDTRFB.” God bless the Grateful Dead.

Chris Harriott is a Deadhead and attorney living in Northern New Jersey. You can follow him on twitter @ckhesq.

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Oklahoma City Music Hall, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, November 14, 1972 
Shake it! WFMU’s Scott McDowell takes a Summer of Dead trip back to ‘72. 
I didn’t have a cool older brother. But my friend Joey did. Actually his older brother was an asshole who beat Joey up all the time, which was not cool at all, but Joey’s brother had tons of Dead tapes and I loved them. Joey and I were stealthy, to sneak listens, or Joey’s brother would kick his ass again while I waited in front of the TV. Constant abuse that kid endured. So much for hippies and peace and love.
The tapes were labeled like this: Hartford ‘82, New York State Pavilion ‘69, Fillmore East ‘70, Boston Garden ‘77. I had the feeling there was an endless supply of these cassettes with their cities, their dates. We were young. The ones we could get our hands on were like gold treasure.
I got a bit older and the important women in my life were always listening to the Grateful Dead. I was attracted to intelligent women with cute dresses and comfortable sandals, post-hippie feminist girls who would throw a punch if necessary. Girls who read Paul Bowles and Annie Dillard, liked sleeping outdoors, drank beer, could speak several languages and knit you a sweater. These women could do it all! They had toe rings. They let their armpit hair grow sometimes, but not as any kind of statement, it just happened.
I am not original, I adore ‘72, it’s unbeatable. My way into a show is an individual song, typically a Jerry ballad: “To Lay Me Down,” “Brokedown Palace,” “Row Jimmy,” “Stella Blue,” “The Wheel,” “He was a Friend of Mine.” I’ll tell you my favorite version of each. Buy me a beer.
The Fox Theatre show from 10/18/72 is already represented. Here’s another classic from fall ‘72, 11/14/72 from Oklahoma City Music Hall. Excellent “Sugaree,” the best “He’s Gone,” and yet another stellar Jerry ballad in “Sing Me Back Home.”
Scott McDowell hosts The Long Rally on WFMU and tweets sometimes @longrally. He married a Deadhead.

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Oklahoma City Music Hall, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, November 14, 1972 

Shake it! WFMU’s Scott McDowell takes a Summer of Dead trip back to ‘72. 

I didn’t have a cool older brother. But my friend Joey did. Actually his older brother was an asshole who beat Joey up all the time, which was not cool at all, but Joey’s brother had tons of Dead tapes and I loved them. Joey and I were stealthy, to sneak listens, or Joey’s brother would kick his ass again while I waited in front of the TV. Constant abuse that kid endured. So much for hippies and peace and love.

The tapes were labeled like this: Hartford ‘82, New York State Pavilion ‘69, Fillmore East ‘70, Boston Garden ‘77. I had the feeling there was an endless supply of these cassettes with their cities, their dates. We were young. The ones we could get our hands on were like gold treasure.

I got a bit older and the important women in my life were always listening to the Grateful Dead. I was attracted to intelligent women with cute dresses and comfortable sandals, post-hippie feminist girls who would throw a punch if necessary. Girls who read Paul Bowles and Annie Dillard, liked sleeping outdoors, drank beer, could speak several languages and knit you a sweater. These women could do it all! They had toe rings. They let their armpit hair grow sometimes, but not as any kind of statement, it just happened.

I am not original, I adore ‘72, it’s unbeatable. My way into a show is an individual song, typically a Jerry ballad: “To Lay Me Down,” “Brokedown Palace,” “Row Jimmy,” “Stella Blue,” “The Wheel,” “He was a Friend of Mine.” I’ll tell you my favorite version of each. Buy me a beer.

The Fox Theatre show from 10/18/72 is already represented. Here’s another classic from fall ‘72, 11/14/72 from Oklahoma City Music Hall. Excellent “Sugaree,” the best “He’s Gone,” and yet another stellar Jerry ballad in “Sing Me Back Home.”

Scott McDowell hosts The Long Rally on WFMU and tweets sometimes @longrally. He married a Deadhead.

Peter & The Wolves
More Invisible Hits! You can go check out my survey of some excellent unreleased Peter Laughner material over on Pitchfork today. If you’re not familiar with the dude (who co-founded Rocket From The Tombs and Pere Ubu), you should definitely take a listen to Take The Guitar Player For A Ride, the out-of-print mid-1990s comp that gathers together some choice cuts. If you already know that stuff, here’s a very cool rarity — a tape of Peter playing live in 1976. The first half is solo acoustic and the second half is with a full band, The Wolves. Tom Herman, Laughner’s Ubu cohort, is on on guitar here, not sure who the other players are. The recording quality leaves a little to be desired (the norm for recordings of Laughner it seems), but it’s a fantastic listen all the same. A healthy mix of covers (VU, Neil Young, Dylan) alongside some great originals (a lovely “Sylvia Plath” and a ferocious “Dear Richard”). There’s also what has to be one of the first Television covers to be performed — a fine and faithful version of “Prove It,” which hadn’t even been released yet. Like I wrote, Laughner was always the hippest guy in the room. 

Peter & The Wolves

More Invisible Hits! You can go check out my survey of some excellent unreleased Peter Laughner material over on Pitchfork today. If you’re not familiar with the dude (who co-founded Rocket From The Tombs and Pere Ubu), you should definitely take a listen to Take The Guitar Player For A Ride, the out-of-print mid-1990s comp that gathers together some choice cuts. If you already know that stuff, here’s a very cool rarity — a tape of Peter playing live in 1976. The first half is solo acoustic and the second half is with a full band, The Wolves. Tom Herman, Laughner’s Ubu cohort, is on on guitar here, not sure who the other players are. The recording quality leaves a little to be desired (the norm for recordings of Laughner it seems), but it’s a fantastic listen all the same. A healthy mix of covers (VU, Neil Young, Dylan) alongside some great originals (a lovely “Sylvia Plath” and a ferocious “Dear Richard”). There’s also what has to be one of the first Television covers to be performed — a fine and faithful version of “Prove It,” which hadn’t even been released yet. Like I wrote, Laughner was always the hippest guy in the room. 

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Terminal Island Correctional Facility, San Pedro, California, August 4, 1971
I’m not letting everyone else have all the fun this summer. Here’s a show I checked out recently — the Dead’s own version of Live At Folsom Prison? The band found themselves playing this low-security federal prison in the Port of Los Angeles because their mentor/soundman/LSD guru Owsley “Bear” Stanley was doing time here. A good reminder that the Dead weren’t just singing about illegal activities — many in their close inner circle were living a genuinely outlaw lifestyle. 
Perhaps realizing that their literally captive audience wasn’t going to be thrilled with kozmic explorations a la “Dark Star,” the band keeps things tight and funky during this set; even “Playing In The Band” clocks in at under five minutes. Pigpen gets lots of chances to shine here, with smoking versions of “Hard To Handle,” “Next Time You See Me” and “Mr. Charlie” choogling along nicely.
Maybe the best thing about the recording, however, the fact that the mix favors Phil Lesh quite a bit. You can really hear what an inventive, unique and just plain weird bassist the dude was, all backwards runs, buoyant grooves and divebomb daring. As much of a distinctive instrumental voice as Garcia when you get right down to it. Zone out in the Phil Zone! 

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Terminal Island Correctional Facility, San Pedro, California, August 4, 1971

I’m not letting everyone else have all the fun this summer. Here’s a show I checked out recently — the Dead’s own version of Live At Folsom Prison? The band found themselves playing this low-security federal prison in the Port of Los Angeles because their mentor/soundman/LSD guru Owsley “Bear” Stanley was doing time here. A good reminder that the Dead weren’t just singing about illegal activities — many in their close inner circle were living a genuinely outlaw lifestyle. 

Perhaps realizing that their literally captive audience wasn’t going to be thrilled with kozmic explorations a la “Dark Star,” the band keeps things tight and funky during this set; even “Playing In The Band” clocks in at under five minutes. Pigpen gets lots of chances to shine here, with smoking versions of “Hard To Handle,” “Next Time You See Me” and “Mr. Charlie” choogling along nicely.

Maybe the best thing about the recording, however, the fact that the mix favors Phil Lesh quite a bit. You can really hear what an inventive, unique and just plain weird bassist the dude was, all backwards runs, buoyant grooves and divebomb daring. As much of a distinctive instrumental voice as Garcia when you get right down to it. Zone out in the Phil Zone! 

Serenata de Trios (Dublab Mix, 7/24/14)
Currently breezing to this lovely mix made by an old Mira Costa High School buddy of mine, Erick Cifuentes. Here’s the scoop: 
“Serenata De Trios is a program on KXLU 88.9 FM of Latin serenade music from the 50s and 60s. For this second dublab mix I once again featured many beautiful standards and classic songs but also chose records with interesting versions and recordings. In the mix there’s also a section with songs about the sea and the beach for you to enjoy this summer.”
Beautiful stuff!

Serenata de Trios (Dublab Mix, 7/24/14)

Currently breezing to this lovely mix made by an old Mira Costa High School buddy of mine, Erick Cifuentes. Here’s the scoop: 

Serenata De Trios is a program on KXLU 88.9 FM of Latin serenade music from the 50s and 60s. For this second dublab mix I once again featured many beautiful standards and classic songs but also chose records with interesting versions and recordings. In the mix there’s also a section with songs about the sea and the beach for you to enjoy this summer.”

Beautiful stuff!