Mickey’s Barn, Novato, California, August 21, 1971
We’ll just keep it rolling with some more Dead/Crosby jams. This one is from the summer of ‘71, recorded at Mickey Hart’s place in Novato, with not only Crosby sitting in, but contributions from Quicksilver’s John Cipollina and … some other dude on keys? Who can say, who can remember. It is fun, loose-limbed stuff, very much a jam session, but plenty of sparks are generated. Especially good is the almost half-hour rendition of Crosby’s “Wall Song.” The sound is a little hazy, but that’s appropriate, isn’t it? 

Mickey’s Barn, Novato, California, August 21, 1971

We’ll just keep it rolling with some more Dead/Crosby jams. This one is from the summer of ‘71, recorded at Mickey Hart’s place in Novato, with not only Crosby sitting in, but contributions from Quicksilver’s John Cipollina and … some other dude on keys? Who can say, who can remember. It is fun, loose-limbed stuff, very much a jam session, but plenty of sparks are generated. Especially good is the almost half-hour rendition of Crosby’s “Wall Song.” The sound is a little hazy, but that’s appropriate, isn’t it? 

David & The Dorks - 1970 Soundboards
Head over to the Sweet Blahg to dig this short-lived collab between members of the Grateful Dead and David Crosby. Garcia, Lesh, Hart, and Kreutzmann were, of course, a big part of the sessions that made up Croz’s If I Could Only Remember My Name, and at the end of 1970 they played out a few times in the Bay Area (some mystery as to whether it’s Mickey or Bill on the drums here). Groovy stuff, though certainly loose! Garcia’s guitar is especially great on tracks like “Cowboy Movie” and “Triad.” At this juncture, the latter tune sounds less like a come-on to a really fabulous threesome and more like a personal invitation to join the Manson Family. Sister Lovers, Water Brothers — listen up! 

David & The Dorks - 1970 Soundboards

Head over to the Sweet Blahg to dig this short-lived collab between members of the Grateful Dead and David Crosby. Garcia, Lesh, Hart, and Kreutzmann were, of course, a big part of the sessions that made up Croz’s If I Could Only Remember My Name, and at the end of 1970 they played out a few times in the Bay Area (some mystery as to whether it’s Mickey or Bill on the drums here). Groovy stuff, though certainly loose! Garcia’s guitar is especially great on tracks like “Cowboy Movie” and “Triad.” At this juncture, the latter tune sounds less like a come-on to a really fabulous threesome and more like a personal invitation to join the Manson Family. Sister Lovers, Water Brothers — listen up! 

Can with Tim Hardin - University of Hertfordshire, Polytechnic, Hatfield, UK; November 21, 1975
Big O has a weird moment in Krautrock history up for your listening pleasure: that time when American folkie Tim Hardin sang with Can. Gott only knows why this happened, but it did! Not sure if it’s a match made in heaven, but it is not too bad either! Of course, you can’t go wrong with Can at this period, as the band improvs more than a half hour’s worth of truly cosmic jams. You can check out a little more Hardin/Can here. Also at the Big O link above, there are some recordings with another vocalist Michael Cousins, and over here, even more with a guy named Thaiga Raj Rajaratnam. 

Can with Tim Hardin - University of Hertfordshire, Polytechnic, Hatfield, UK; November 21, 1975

Big O has a weird moment in Krautrock history up for your listening pleasure: that time when American folkie Tim Hardin sang with Can. Gott only knows why this happened, but it did! Not sure if it’s a match made in heaven, but it is not too bad either! Of course, you can’t go wrong with Can at this period, as the band improvs more than a half hour’s worth of truly cosmic jams. You can check out a little more Hardin/Can here. Also at the Big O link above, there are some recordings with another vocalist Michael Cousins, and over here, even more with a guy named Thaiga Raj Rajaratnam. 

13th Floor Elevators - KAZZ-FM, Austin, Texas, February 1966
A new find? This is apparently one of the (if not the) earliest live recordings in existence of the 13th Floor Elevators, and holy shit, it is unhinged from the very first note. Over here, Patrick Lundborg says: “The band is absolutely frantic, the crowd (possibly fueled by the free LSD handed out by the group) is ecstatic and loud, and the compressed, somewhat overloaded nature of the recording becomes an advantage. Songs include ‘Roller Coaster’, ‘Monkey Island’, covers of two early Beatles numbers, and an absolutely blazing 7-minute version of ‘Gloria.’” Careful, this thing is scorching.
EDIT: Actually seems like Lundborg is referring to a different KAZZ-FM broadcast? My bad! No Beatles covers here — tracklist is: Gloria, You’re Gonna Miss Me, Tried To Hide, Roller Coaster, You Really Got Me (Kinks cover). 
ONE MORE EDIT: OK, here’s the other KAZZ broadcast Lundborg was referring to, from a month later at the same club. It is also amazing. 

13th Floor Elevators - KAZZ-FM, Austin, Texas, February 1966

A new find? This is apparently one of the (if not the) earliest live recordings in existence of the 13th Floor Elevators, and holy shit, it is unhinged from the very first note. Over here, Patrick Lundborg says: “The band is absolutely frantic, the crowd (possibly fueled by the free LSD handed out by the group) is ecstatic and loud, and the compressed, somewhat overloaded nature of the recording becomes an advantage. Songs include ‘Roller Coaster’, ‘Monkey Island’, covers of two early Beatles numbers, and an absolutely blazing 7-minute version of ‘Gloria.’” Careful, this thing is scorching.

EDIT: Actually seems like Lundborg is referring to a different KAZZ-FM broadcast? My bad! No Beatles covers here — tracklist is: Gloria, You’re Gonna Miss Me, Tried To Hide, Roller Coaster, You Really Got Me (Kinks cover). 

ONE MORE EDIT: OK, here’s the other KAZZ broadcast Lundborg was referring to, from a month later at the same club. It is also amazing. 

"Paranoid Cat (part 1)" - Chris Forsyth & The Solar Motel Band

Chris Forsyth is taking his Solar Motel Band on the road in a few weeks. I highly recommend going to see them! For purely selfish reasons, naturally. I figure if they get a good turnout on this go-round, they might make it to Colorado one of these days. Anyway, check out this rehearsal video for a taste of the glories that are in store. 

Nick Drake - Second Grace
If you’ve never heard it, Big O has the two-volume Second Grace bootleg up for the download. Made up of home recordings that have never been officially released, a lot of it is bottom of the barrel stuff, though the fingerpicked version of “Place To Be” and the solo demo of “Hazey Jane” are totally great. You can also take a listen to “Early Morning Monologue,” a rare recording of Nick’s speaking voice. I know! 

Nick Drake - Second Grace

If you’ve never heard it, Big O has the two-volume Second Grace bootleg up for the download. Made up of home recordings that have never been officially released, a lot of it is bottom of the barrel stuff, though the fingerpicked version of “Place To Be” and the solo demo of “Hazey Jane” are totally great. You can also take a listen to “Early Morning Monologue,” a rare recording of Nick’s speaking voice. I know! 

John Fahey Mix Tapes
Unbelievable! Thanks to Total Vibration and Dying For Bad Music for alerting me to this.
The uploader says: “In the 1990’s my future wife was a record store clerk in Portland, Oregon. American guitar legend John Fahey was living in a nearby town and would visit the shop. Here are two mix cassettes that he made for her during that time.”
Strange sounds abound, from international garage rock to avant-classical drone to pummeling industrial sound collages. There’s even a little bit of acoustic guitar, too. Not much, though. But it’s a fascinating window into where Fahey’s head was at during this period. The latter days of the guy’s career remain sort of mysterious to me, but these tapes seem to fill in a piece of the puzzle.  

John Fahey Mix Tapes

Unbelievable! Thanks to Total Vibration and Dying For Bad Music for alerting me to this.

The uploader says: “In the 1990’s my future wife was a record store clerk in Portland, Oregon. American guitar legend John Fahey was living in a nearby town and would visit the shop. Here are two mix cassettes that he made for her during that time.”

Strange sounds abound, from international garage rock to avant-classical drone to pummeling industrial sound collages. There’s even a little bit of acoustic guitar, too. Not much, though. But it’s a fascinating window into where Fahey’s head was at during this period. The latter days of the guy’s career remain sort of mysterious to me, but these tapes seem to fill in a piece of the puzzle.  

Pete Seeger on the Johnny Cash Show, March 4, 1970

RIP to folk titan Pete Seeger, a true believer in the power and potency of song. It’s hard in 2014 to remember that writing a song like “If I Had A Hammer” or “Where Have All The Flowers Gone” could be a genuinely radical (and genuinely brave) thing to do, but goddamn it’s a good thing to be reminded of. Will we ever see another like him? 

"Walkin’ Down The Line" - Linda Ronstadt, Playboy After Dark, October 1969

I’m breezing through Linda Rostadt’s new-ish memoir, Simple Dreams, and while I wish it was heavier on Topanga Canyon and lighter on Pirates of Penzance, it is an entertaining read. Here’s a clip from the early days, when Linda and band appeared on the super groovy Playboy After Dark program. Everything from this show looks like it could an outtake from Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls, doesn’t it?